Patient Education

Cornerstone OBGyn would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Cornerstone OBGyn provides a full range of medical services including the following:

Menopause

Menopause is the time in a woman's life when her menstrual period has stopped. Menopause is caused by a decrease in the ovaries' production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone, which eventually results in the ovaries' ceasing to produce eggs, and the end of menstruation.

A woman has reached menopause when she has not had a menstrual period for at least 12 months. Menopause is a natural process that takes several years. During this time, fertility decreases, and periods often change in duration, frequency, and amount of blood flow. This stage is known as perimenopause, and it is often when symptoms of menopause begin. The average age that menopause occurs is 51, although it may occur prematurely in women who have had total hysterectomies or have received chemotherapy or radiation treatments. ...

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Labor and Delivery

As her due date approaches, an expectant mother often looks for signs that her labor is starting. It is important for a woman to be aware of the changes that her body is going through as it prepares for labor, and what to expect when the labor process begins. If a woman suspects that she is in labor, she should contact her doctor or midwife immediately. ...

Read More...

Breast Cancer FAQs

How prevalent is breast cancer?

Approximately 1 in 8 women in America will have breast cancer in her lifetime. It is the most common cancer in women, regardless or race or ethnicity.

What are the known risk factors?

The known risks for developing breast cancer include: ...

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Contraception

Contraception is any method of birth control used to prevent pregnancy. A woman has many birth control options; which are appropriate depend on her age, overall health and lifestyle. Contraception can be permanent or temporary. Some types of contraception are more effective than others, and it is up to each woman to decide which type is right for her. ...

Read More...

Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse (vaginal prolapse) is a common condition in women, occurring when a pelvic organ shifts from its normal position to push against the vaginal walls. This movement causes pressure, stretching and pain. Most frequently, pelvic organ prolapse occurs after childbirth, menopause, or a hysterectomy when the muscles and ligaments supporting a woman's pelvic organs become more lax. ...


Read More...

Premenstrual Syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a condition characterized by a group of symptoms women commonly experience before their monthly menstrual period. These symptoms usually abate once the menstrual flow begins. About 85 percent of women suffer from at least one symptom of PMS during each menstrual cycle, although most cases are fairly mild and do not interfere with a woman's normal activities. Severe cases of PMS may be diagnosed as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). ...


Read More...

Mammogram

A mammogram is an X-ray examination of the breast that is performed to detect breast cancer in its earliest stages, often before any signs or symptoms are present. Mammograms allow early detection of small tumors, which are easier to treat than larger, more developed ones. They can also detect ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), small abnormal growths in a breast's milk ducts. Early removal of these growths helps to reduce the risk of future problems. ...


Read More...

Prenatal Testing

Prenatal testing is an important part of prenatal care, essential in ensuring the healthy growth and development of the fetus. Women who receive prenatal care have healthier babies, are less likely to deliver prematurely, and have fewer pregnancy-related problems. Prenatal care should begin as early as possible in the pregnancy. Doctor visits are usually monthly, and become more frequent as the pregnancy progresses. Routine tests at these visits include urine testing and blood-pressure checks. In addition, there are several prenatal tests performed only at specific times during the pregnancy. They are administered to monitor the health of the fetus and, in some cases, the mother. ...


Read More...

Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia, previously known as toxemia, is the sudden increase in blood pressure of a pregnant woman. If this condition occurs it is usually by the 20th week of pregnancy, resulting in hypertension and, usually, elevated protein levels in the urine. Preeclampsia, if left untreated, can result in serious complications for both mother and fetus. Eclampsia is a more severe form of preeclampsia. ...


Read More...

Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids (myomas) are tumors that grow in the uterine walls. They are usually benign, and vary in size and quantity. The exact cause of uterine fibroids is unknown, but their formation may be affected by genetics, with a woman being more likely to develop them if she has a family member similarly afflicted. Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms and do not require any treatment, although, in some cases, they lead to pregnancy complications. Uterine fibroids are most common in women older than 30, and during the reproductive years. ...


Read More...

Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Section

A woman who has previously delivered a child by Cesarean section (C-section) may be able to deliver her next child vaginally. This process, known as vaginal birth after Cesarean section, or VBAC, had not been an option in the past. Once a woman delivered by C-section, all successive births were C-sections. Medical advancements and improvements in surgical methods have now made VBAC a safe and fairly common delivery procedure. ...

Read More...

Annual Gynecological Exam

The annual gynecological exam, also known as a gynecological well-visit, is a yearly preventative and diagnostic examination that serves to maintain the wellness of female patients, as well as to monitor any ongoing physical or hormonal conditions. This annual visit is an opportunity for doctors to counsel patients about maintaining healthy lifestyles and minimizing health risks. The examination includes a routine breast and pelvic exam, and may include a screening for sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. ...


Read More...

Female Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence, the involuntary loss of urine, is more common in women, especially during and after pregnancy, although it can affect people of all ages. While not usually a serious medical condition, incontinence can be embarrassing and can adversely affect quality of life. A symptom, rather than a condition, female urinary incontinence can range from mild stress incontinence to complete loss of bladder control. ...


Read More...

Cervical Dysplasia

Cervical dysplasia is the abnormal growth of cells on the surface lining of the cervix, which is located at the lower part of the uterus and opens into the vagina. Cervical dysplasia is more common in sexually active women between the ages of 25 and 35, however it can occur at any age in sexually active women. Cervical dysplasia is often caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common viral infection transmitted by sexual contact. Cervical dysplasia usually has no noticeable symptoms, and often remains unnoticed until it is discovered during a gynecological examination. ...


Read More...

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

Abnormal uterine bleeding is classified as any bleeding that occurs between regular menstrual periods. In some cases, abnormal uterine bleeding occurs after intercourse, or in women who are postmenopausal. Heavier-than-normal menstrual bleeding that lasts for more than seven days is considered abnormal uterine bleeding. ...

Read More...


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Menopause

Menopause is the time in a woman's life when her menstrual period has stopped. Menopause is caused by a decrease in the ovaries' production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone, which eventually results in the ovaries' ceasing to produce eggs, and the end of menstruation.

A woman has reached menopause when she has not had a menstrual period for at least 12 months. Menopause is a natural process that takes several years. During this time, fertility decreases, and periods often change in duration, frequency, and amount of blood flow. This stage is known as perimenopause, and it is often when symptoms of menopause begin. The average age that menopause occurs is 51, although it may occur prematurely in women who have had total hysterectomies or have received chemotherapy or radiation treatments. ...


Read More...

Labor and Delivery

As her due date approaches, an expectant mother often looks for signs that her labor is starting. It is important for a woman to be aware of the changes that her body is going through as it prepares for labor, and what to expect when the labor process begins. If a woman suspects that she is in labor, she should contact her doctor or midwife immediately. ...


Read More...

Contraception

Contraception is any method of birth control used to prevent pregnancy. A woman has many birth control options; which are appropriate depend on her age, overall health and lifestyle. Contraception can be permanent or temporary. Some types of contraception are more effective than others, and it is up to each woman to decide which type is right for her. ...


Read More...

Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse (vaginal prolapse) is a common condition in women, occurring when a pelvic organ shifts from its normal position to push against the vaginal walls. This movement causes pressure, stretching and pain. Most frequently, pelvic organ prolapse occurs after childbirth, menopause, or a hysterectomy when the muscles and ligaments supporting a woman's pelvic organs become more lax. ...


Read More...

Premenstrual Syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a condition characterized by a group of symptoms women commonly experience before their monthly menstrual period. These symptoms usually abate once the menstrual flow begins. About 85 percent of women suffer from at least one symptom of PMS during each menstrual cycle, although most cases are fairly mild and do not interfere with a woman's normal activities. Severe cases of PMS may be diagnosed as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). ...


Read More...

Mammogram

A mammogram is an X-ray examination of the breast that is performed to detect breast cancer in its earliest stages, often before any signs or symptoms are present. Mammograms allow early detection of small tumors, which are easier to treat than larger, more developed ones. They can also detect ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), small abnormal growths in a breast's milk ducts. Early removal of these growths helps to reduce the risk of future problems. ...


Read More...

Prenatal Testing

Prenatal testing is an important part of prenatal care, essential in ensuring the healthy growth and development of the fetus. Women who receive prenatal care have healthier babies, are less likely to deliver prematurely, and have fewer pregnancy-related problems. Prenatal care should begin as early as possible in the pregnancy. Doctor visits are usually monthly, and become more frequent as the pregnancy progresses. Routine tests at these visits include urine testing and blood-pressure checks. In addition, there are several prenatal tests performed only at specific times during the pregnancy. They are administered to monitor the health of the fetus and, in some cases, the mother. ...


Read More...

Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia, previously known as toxemia, is the sudden increase in blood pressure of a pregnant woman. If this condition occurs it is usually by the 20th week of pregnancy, resulting in hypertension and, usually, elevated protein levels in the urine. Preeclampsia, if left untreated, can result in serious complications for both mother and fetus. Eclampsia is a more severe form of preeclampsia. ...


Read More...

Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids (myomas) are tumors that grow in the uterine walls. They are usually benign, and vary in size and quantity. The exact cause of uterine fibroids is unknown, but their formation may be affected by genetics, with a woman being more likely to develop them if she has a family member similarly afflicted. Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms and do not require any treatment, although, in some cases, they lead to pregnancy complications. Uterine fibroids are most common in women older than 30, and during the reproductive years. ...


Read More...

Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Section

A woman who has previously delivered a child by Cesarean section (C-section) may be able to deliver her next child vaginally. This process, known as vaginal birth after Cesarean section, or VBAC, had not been an option in the past. Once a woman delivered by C-section, all successive births were C-sections. Medical advancements and improvements in surgical methods have now made VBAC a safe and fairly common delivery procedure. ...


Read More...

Annual Gynecological Exam

The annual gynecological exam, also known as a gynecological well-visit, is a yearly preventative and diagnostic examination that serves to maintain the wellness of female patients, as well as to monitor any ongoing physical or hormonal conditions. This annual visit is an opportunity for doctors to counsel patients about maintaining healthy lifestyles and minimizing health risks. The examination includes a routine breast and pelvic exam, and may include a screening for sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. ...


Read More...

Female Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence, the involuntary loss of urine, is more common in women, especially during and after pregnancy, although it can affect people of all ages. While not usually a serious medical condition, incontinence can be embarrassing and can adversely affect quality of life. A symptom, rather than a condition, female urinary incontinence can range from mild stress incontinence to complete loss of bladder control. ...


Read More...

Cervical Dysplasia

Cervical dysplasia is the abnormal growth of cells on the surface lining of the cervix, which is located at the lower part of the uterus and opens into the vagina. Cervical dysplasia is more common in sexually active women between the ages of 25 and 35, however it can occur at any age in sexually active women. Cervical dysplasia is often caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common viral infection transmitted by sexual contact. Cervical dysplasia usually has no noticeable symptoms, and often remains unnoticed until it is discovered during a gynecological examination. ...


Read More...

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

Abnormal uterine bleeding is classified as any bleeding that occurs between regular menstrual periods. In some cases, abnormal uterine bleeding occurs after intercourse, or in women who are postmenopausal. Heavier-than-normal menstrual bleeding that lasts for more than seven days is considered abnormal uterine bleeding. ...


Read More...